Wearing History – latest patterns

Seems that sewing is becoming a dying art amongst the young ladies of today, which is why I love to keep my hand in. I have taught myself over the years and you can only really learn by doing. It’s also nice to have a bunch friends in the vintage scene that sew and a few that even have their own line of patterns for sale. One my favourite lines comes from Wearing History, which is run by my friend Lauren Maringola. She is an amazing seamstress and you can see many of the pieces in her line made up on her site. Here are some of her latest offerings!

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Some vintage tie tips for the chaps

Vintage ties from the 20s to the 50s are wonderfully stylish things, but there are differences between the decades and how they were worn. Here are some tips for my swing-era and vintage loving friends:

1920s and early 1930s ties were all about texture, simple designs and were very much an understatement as far as a mans entire outfit went. It wasn’t until mid 1930s to 1940s that ties with wildly colourful and bold designs became more popular. Either tie style can produce a fabulous vintage look, but the ties should make sense with the rest of the outfit.

1930s tie styling
Necktie widths grew wider (about 3.5 inches) and shorter to go with the wider suit lapels and oversize shirt collars of the 30′s and silk ties dominated as did brocade. In the 1920s and 30s there were very few men who would have worn a long tie without wearing a vest, coat, or jumper as  well. A tie under a vest looks very suave and I was told by vintage tie expert at and Art Deco convention a few years ago that if you tie your tie and the thin end ends up longer than the front end – do not fret! Apparently this was common back in the day and men would sometimes tuck the tie into their waistband.

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1940s tie styling
Boldly coloured ties with crazy designs in rayon and poplin became hugely popular in the 1940s and were used by men to express themselves in world of suits and formality. In the 40s, high-cut trousers meant that mens ties became shorter and wider. If you wear a 1940s tie with modern lower cut trousers, you should leave at least two buttons above the waist uncovered.  If you are trying to tie a vintage tie from the 1940s, you should use the half-windsor knot because otherwise the bulk of material will produce a knot as big as your fist if you used the full Windsor (normally used with modern ties).

Here are some ties that are currently for sale in my Etsy store.

Vintage 1940s Necktie - Rayon with Moroon Polkadots   Vintage 1940s Rayon Necktie with Geometric patterns

Vintage 1950s Necktie - Satin Rayon in Lavender with Abstract Patterns   Vintage 1950s Necktie - Satin Rayon in Blue

Vintage 1950s Rayon Necktie in Pale Blue and White   Vintage 1940s Necktie - Satin Rayon Flowers and Block Colours

Vintage 1940s Necktie - Satin Rayon Leaves in Moroon and Grey   Vintage Early 1960s Woven Wool Men's Necktie

New Etsy items for July

Some great new things in the shop this month including a 1930s celluloid ‘lady on skis’ brooch and a 1930s bracelet, earrings and brooch from Austria. A 1940s lady head vase and knitted dress. 1950s necklace, handbag, gloves and knitting books. Enjoy!

 Vintage 1950s White Eyelet 2-button Length gloves   Vintage 1930s Celluloid Brooch Lady on Skis
Vintage 1930s Edelweiss Bracelet, Brooch and Earrings Set    Vintage 1950s Jade Green Beaded Necklace / Choker
Vintage 1940s Ochre Knitted Blouse & Skirt set - M to L

Vintage 1960s Knit Pattern Book - 'Patons'    Vintage 1950s Knit Pattern Book - 'Patons'

Vintage late 1950s Knit Pattern Book by 'Villawool' - pics by Max Dupain    Vintage 1968 Knit Pattern Book - 'Patons' Mod

Vintage 1940s Small Lady head Vase   Vintage 1960s Silver Lamé Handbag

Vintage 1950s Beaded Floral Handbag   Vintage 1950s Black 2-button Length gloves with fringe

 

Amazing 1927 photo – colourised!

This has to be one of the coolest photos from the 1920s I have ever seen. Thanks to the guys at Shorpy’s for putting this out there 🙂